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Portail de solutions pour les communautés

Le carrefour numérique du Canada pour favoriser l’innovation inclusive et transformatrice dans les communautés du pays.

Le Portail de solutions pour les communautés se veut un espace de collaboration virtuel visant à aider les communautés canadiennes (petites, moyennes ou grandes) à marquer durablement la vie de leurs résidentes et résidents par la mise en application d’approches relatives aux villes intelligentes. Le Portail, qui s’inscrit dans le Réseau de solutions pour les communautés de Villes d’avenir Canada, est une plateforme de ressources, d’outils et de relations nécessaires pour créer, dans l’environnement des villes intelligentes, des villes inclusives où il est agréable de vivre.

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Qu’est-ce qu’une ville intelligente ouverte?

Une ville intelligente ouverte est un lieu où tous les secteurs et les résidents collaborent afin que les données et les technologies soient utilisées pour développer la communauté d’une manière juste, éthique et transparente qui concilie le développement économique, le progrès social et la responsabilité à l’égard de l’environnement.

Découvrez comment contribuer.

En tant qu’entité responsable du programme, Evergreen travaille avec NordOuvert et d’autres partenaires pour offrir des services de consultation et des programmes événementiels destinés aux leaders municipaux et de communautés à s’y retrouver dans l’environnement des villes ouvertes intelligentes. Abonnez-vous dès aujourd’hui pour en savoir plus et découvrir comment contribuer.

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Trousses d’outils, rapports et autres ressources pour vous orienter.

Gouvernance

How to be Smart(er) in Mid-Sized Cities in Ontario

Auteur(s) : Nikki Gladstone, Jo Flatt, Julie Fader, Megan Hellstern (Evergreen)

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : 2/18/2019


It is increasingly clear that data and technology are becoming synonymous with city-building. This movement towards “smart cities” will continue to accelerate in the years to come, presenting a critical opportunity and challenge for leaders in communities of all sizes. This paper, written in partnership with Code for Canada, discusses the opportunities for data and technology in Canada’s mid-sized cities, with a particular focus on Ontario.

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Size: 1.8MB

Données ouvertes

How Can We Improve Urban Resilience with Open Data?

Auteur(s) : Jean-Noé Landry (OpenNorth), Keira Webster (OpenNorth, Geothink), Bianca Wylie (OpenNorth), Pamela Robinson MCIP RPP (Urban Planning Ryerson University, Geothink Researcher)

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : 12/1/2016


Urban resilience is focused around issues that are constantly changing and evolving, such as migration patterns, employment trends, industrial development, and climate change. Launched at the OGP’s annual conference in Paris in 2016, OpenNorth’s discussion paper on the value added by open data in addressing urban resilience is based on the input of 35 global south and north experts. The discussion paper informs OpenNorth’s contribution in developing the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR)’s Making Cities Resilient Campaign toolkit.

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Engagement citoyen

The Civic Tech Playbook for Canadian Municipalities: A guide to engaging with your local civic tech community

Auteur(s) : Aaron Wytze Wilson & Hebah Masood (Code for Canada)

Éditeur : Code for Canada

Date de mise à jour : 11/1/2018


The Civic Tech Playbookis adapts the strategies and lessons from Mark Headd's book "How to Talk to Civic Hackers: A Guide for Public Servants That Want to Engage and Collaborate with their Local Technology Community" to the Canadian context, complete with on-the-ground examples of how Canadian cities and civic tech communities are collaborating to deliver better outcomes for residents.

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Données ouvertes

Auteur(s) : Zoya Sodhi

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : Oct 2018


Smart cities are becoming an increasingly significant part of our world as our dependency and use of data and technology continues to rise.Getting to the Open Smart City, a new report from Future Cities Canada and OpenNorth, explores the concept of “openness” within a smart city context. The report analyses how the use of open smart technologies and approaches can help cities achieve more accessible and equitable outcomes, and provides recommendations to how our cities can integrate openness into our data policies.

Auteur(s) : Tracey P. Lauriault (Carleton University), Rachel Bloom (OpenNorth) and Jean-Noé Landry (OpenNorth).

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : April 2018


The Open Smart Cities Guide is the end result of Open Smart Cities in Canada, a year long collaborative research project led by OpenNorth and funded by Natural Resources Canada's GeoConnections program.This guide provides a first ever definition for an Open Smart City and is intended as a starter kit for city stakeholders and decision makers. We expect that this living document will grow as we receive more input and learn about additional people, projects, practices and resources that contribute to Open Smart Cities. Please feel free to email info@opennorth.ca for more information or to provide your input.

Auteur(s) : Tracey Lauriault Rachel Bloom Carly Livingstone Jean-Noé Landry

Éditeur : SocArXiv Papers

Date de mise à jour : April 2018


This executive summary consolidates findings from a smart city environmental scan (E-Scan) and five case studies of smart city initiatives in Canada. The E-Scan entailed compiling and reviewing documents and definitions produced by smart city vendors, think tanks, associations, consulting firms, standards organizations, conferences, civil society organizations, including critical academic literature, government reports, marketing material, specifications and requirements documents. This research was motivated by a desire to identify international shapers of smart cities and to better understand what differentiates a smart city from an Open Smart City.

Auteur(s) : Tracey P. Lauriault (Carleton University), Rachel Bloom (NordOuvert), et Jean-Noé Landry (NordOuvert)

Éditeur : NordOuvert

Date de mise à jour : April 2018


Le Guide des villes intelligentes ouvertes présente la toute première définition d’une ville intelligente ouverte. Le guide est destiné à servir de trousse de départ pour les différents intervenants et décideurs des villes.

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth and Open Data Charter

Éditeur : OpenNorth and Open Data Charter

Date de mise à jour : Feb 2018


In collaboration with the Open Data Charter Secretariat, OpenNorth interviewed city managers, local civic leaders, and elected officials from four cities in Canada, the Province of Ontario, and three cities around the world (Buenos Aires, Argentina; Lviv, Ukraine; Durham, NC, USA) to identify barriers to adoption of open data and how support future needs. This report examines the important role the Open Data Charter network can play in connecting local governments around the world. Of the 52 governments that have adopted the Open Data Charter, 35 are local or subnational. This report concludes with six important findings about open data for local government including that : 1) There are strong incentives for cities to open up their data, and the Charter can help them to do this; 2) If “open by default” is applied to a city’s broader data management systems it can allow better internal data sharing, as well as improving access to information for citizens; 3) Opening data does not automatically create a data literate public​; 4) Achieving impact through open data requires interjurisdictional cooperation; 5) Policy and standard development is not keeping up with the pace of change; 6) Governments cannot be ‘open by default’ without open procurement.​

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : Dec 2017


Developing and maintaining data standards is difficult, but a necessary step to unlock the potential for open data. To maximise the potential for widespread adoption, new standards initiatives must build upon the success and failure of existing standards. We document our own experiences with Open511, Popolo and Represent to share with the open data community.

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth and Powered by Data

Éditeur : OpenNorth and Powered by Data

Date de mise à jour : Nov 2017


In collaboration with Powered by Data, OpenNorth identified the opportunities for Canada to take a leadership role in the global open government movement and expand the Federal Government’s open government policy internationally. We position open government within the arena of foreign policy and as an alternative form of Canadian soft power. Based on the views of 13 Canadian open government experts, the following 6 themes provide guidance for Canada’s leadership role as a member of the Open Government Partnership Steering Committee: Lead by Example; Active and Proactive Participation by Politicians and Civil Servants at all Levels; Clarify the Message; Go Beyond Compliance; Translate Open Government to Other Policy Areas; Reinforce the Relationship with Canadian Civil Society Organisations

Auteur(s) : Paulina Marczak (Queen’s University, former OpenNorth research intern), Renée Sieber (McGill University, Geothink Lead) in September 2017

Éditeur : Wiley Online Library

Date de mise à jour : Sept 2017


Legislatures are increasingly attuned to the rhetoric of open data for legislative content like bills and Hansards that dictates it be freely accessible, repurposable, machine-readable, standardized across subregions, and available without licensing restrictions. The call for legislative openness also derives from open data advocates, who seek to apply the rules of open data to unstructured information. We do not know whether legislative openness in Canada, at the provincial and territorial level, matches the rhetoric of open data. This study focused on commonly occurring categories of information on subnational legislative websites and examined their copyright, availability, archivability, information timeliness, and plain language descriptions.

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth, Powered by Data, Data for Good

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : Aug 2017


Reporting from the 2nd annual Data 4 Impact workshop held in Edmonton (AB) in the lead-up to the Canadian Open Data Summit 2017. The event brought together more than 80 regional and local not-for-profit organizations to raise awareness about the value of data sharing within the sector, provide frameworks and techniques to facilitate the use of data and share use cases of community data collaboratives. The workshop was co-organized and facilitated in collaboration with Data4Good and Powered by Data.

Auteur(s) : Hamish Robertson and Joanne Travaglia

Éditeur : LSE Impact Blog

Date de mise à jour : July 2017


We are in the midst of a data revolution, one reliant on the capture, analysis, and visual representation of enlarged quantitative data, in increasingly digital formats. Hamish Robertson and Joanne Travaglia argue that big data quantification is now not only a mechanism for extracting information but has become an idea with social and political power in its own right. The lack of critique of quantitative methods and their application contributes to the existing and potentially coercive power of digital information systems and their attendant methods, and enhances the potential for “collateral damage” associated with such applications.

Auteur(s) : Erin Bryson (OpenNorth, Geothink), Jean-Noé Landry (OpenNorth), Prof Peter Johnson (University of Waterloo)

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : Jan 2017


The international Open Data Charter (ODC) is a set of 6 principles that provide governments with a common foundation upon which to realise the full potential of open data. As Steward of the ODC, OpenNorth interviewed ten cities and four provinces in Canada to discuss how the ODC could align with sub-national open data policies and programs. The report is a collaboration with Geothink. The City of Edmonton was Canada’s first city to subsequently adopt the ODC and OpenNorth currently advises the Province of Ontario on the ODC’s implementation.

Auteur(s) : Detroit Community Technology Project and Detroit Digital Justice Coalition

Éditeur : Detroit Community Technology Project and Detroit Digital Justice Coalition

Date de mise à jour : Winter 2017


To understand what quitable open data practices could look like, Detroit Community Technology Project and Detroit Digital Justice Coalition asked a broad spectrum of Detroit residents to consider the potential benefits and harms of various data sets currently available on the City's Open Data Portal. From there, they assessed what actions can be taken by the City to maximize benefits and minimize harms, and investigated open data policies and tools in place in other cities that model their vision for data justice.

Auteur(s) : UNDP and UN Global Pulse

Éditeur : UNDP and UN Global Pulse

Date de mise à jour : December 2016


This guide provides step-by-step guidance for development practitioners to leverage new sources of data.

Auteur(s) : Jean-Noé Landry (OpenNorth), Keira Webster (OpenNorth, Geothink), Bianca Wylie (OpenNorth), Pamela Robinson MCIP RPP (Urban Planning Ryerson University, Geothink Researcher)

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : Dec 2016


Urban resilience is focused around issues that are constantly changing and evolving, such as migration patterns, employment trends, industrial development, and climate change. Launched at the OGP’s annual conference in Paris in 2016, OpenNorth’s discussion paper on the value added by open data in addressing urban resilience is based on the input of 35 global south and north experts. The discussion paper informs OpenNorth’s contribution in developing the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR)’s Making Cities Resilient Campaign toolkit.

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth, Data for Good, New Brunswick Social Policy Research Network

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : Aug 2016


Reporting from the 1st annual Data 4 Impact workshop held in Saint John (NB) in the lead-up to the Canadian Open Data Summit 2016. The event brought together more than 60 regional and local not-for-profit organizations to raise awareness about the value of data sharing within the sector, provide frameworks and techniques to facilitate the use of data and share use cases of community data collaboratives. The workshop was co-organized and facilitated in collaboration with Data4Good and the New Brunswick Social Policy Research Networks’ (NBSPRN).

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : April 2016


Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) commissioned this study from OpenNorth in 2016, when Canada was facing an influx of Syrian refugees. The report focuses on how IRCC’s open data strategy and infrastructure could better meet the data and information needs of their stakeholders, with key recommendations on data quality, accessibility and standards. The study is based on a combined qualitative and qualitative data user needs identification methodology developed by OpenNorth

Auteur(s) : Stéphane Guidoin (OpenNorth), Paulina Marczak (OpenNorth), Juan Pane (ILDA), James McKinney (OpenNorth)

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : Spring 2015


This OpenNorth study examines open data standards practices to determine where they produce barriers to accessibility in terms of discovering, accessing and using data. It recommends standards for more global adoption to enable information sharing. The findings were presented at the International Open Data Conference (IODC) in 2015 for which OpenNorth served as the conference reporting anchor for the standards stream.

Auteur(s) : cippic and OpenNorth

Éditeur : cippic

Date de mise à jour :


Smart city initiatives are often public-private partnerships, involving two or more public and private sector organizations working together towards a long-term goal. This FAQ discusses smart city technologies and considers how smart cities can be made “open.” It also describes how Canadian laws currently regulate smart city projects and technologies.

Engagement citoyen

Auteur(s) : Mary Pickering

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : Sept 2019


Collective Impact in Motion is a report by The Atmospheric Fund and Evergreen that describes the creation and work of Move the GTHA. It provides an example of what a collective impact group is, how it works, and its purpose as well as how it can be supported and funded.

Auteur(s) : John Brodhead

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : July 2019


Intersection is a magazine profiling innovation and inspiration within cities. Each volume contains interviews with city-builders from different industries, profiles game changing ideas and exposes some of the newest initiatives occurring within Canadian cities.

Auteur(s) : Lhazin Nedup

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : June 2019


This toolkit will guide you through your planning for 100In1Day Canada. Learn about 100In1Day as a global platform and the Canadian iniative and how to plan your intervention, and how to fund and promote it.

Auteur(s) : John Brodhead

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : Feb 2019


Intersection is a magazine profiling innovation and inspiration within cities. Each volume contains interviews with city-builders from different industries, profiles game changing ideas and exposes some of the newest initiatives occurring within Canadian cities.

Auteur(s) : Viet Vu, Creig Lamb, Asher Zafar

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : January 2019


This report provides the most current snapshot of Canada’s tech workers

Auteur(s) : Aaron Wytze Wilson & Hebah Masood

Éditeur : Code for Canada

Date de mise à jour : November 2018


The Civic Tech Playbookis adapts the strategies and lessons from Mark Headd's book "How to Talk to Civic Hackers: A Guide for Public Servants That Want to Engage and Collaborate with their Local Technology Community" to the Canadian context, complete with on-the-ground examples of how Canadian cities and civic tech communities are collaborating to deliver better outcomes for residents.

Auteur(s) : Annalise Huynh, Nisa Malli

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : June 2018


A map of the digital literacy education and training landscape in Canada, including the existing gaps and potential opportunities to improve the development and supply of digital literacy skills

Auteur(s) : Creig Lamb, Daniel Munro, Viet Vu

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : May 2018


A number of high-level recommendations designed to help policymakers, business leaders, educators, unions, and workers address the implications of automation for Ontario’s labour

Auteur(s) : Clara MacCallum Fraser

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : May 2018


In Indigenous—Municipal Relations: Beyond Consultation, Clara MacCallum Fraser addresses the question of how municipalities begin to build relationships with Indigenous communities within whose territory they reside, and begin to move beyond token gestures and acknowledgements, towards deeply meaningful engagement.

Auteur(s) : Neil Bradford and Michelle Baldwin

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : May 2018


In New Civic Leadership for Mid-Sized Cities: Pillar Nonprofit Network in London Neil Bradford and Michelle Baldwin explore the theory and practice of “new civic leadership” – an approach that values holistic community visions, multi-sectoral collaboration, and broad-based public engagement in shaping the city’s future.”

Auteur(s) : Evergreen

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : April 2018


From late 2017 to early 2018, Future Cities Canada worked with partners across the country to host a series of roundtable conversations and meetings with municipalities and communities. These meetings gathered insights about the opportunities and challenges facing cities and regions in order to collectively build a vision for equitable, regenerative and prosperous 21st century cities. These conversations from each city are captured in this final document.

Auteur(s) : Tea Hadziristic

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : April 2018


This literature review informs the Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship (BII+E)’s research on the state of digital literacy in Canada, grounding it in existing research.

Auteur(s) : Isha Nepal and Emily Kuzan

Éditeur : Code for Canada

Date de mise à jour : August 2017


Civic tech communities are being established in cities around the world. They are a volunteer-run hub for innovation and networking between public servants, technology and design professionals, and civic activists. The community generally revolves around a weekly ‘hacknight’. This guide is meant to provide key tips to help you establish successful hacknights.

This toolkit is a work in progress created by Isha Nepal and Emily Kuzan on behalf of Code for Canada for the global civic tech community. Feel free to leave comments and suggestions throughout the documents for updates and improvements.

Size: 1.5MB Open PDF

Auteur(s) : Commission de l’éthique en science et en technologie,Gouvernement du Québec

Éditeur : Commission de l’éthique en science et en technologie,Gouvernement du Québec

Date de mise à jour : aout 2017


Commission de l’éthique en science et en technologie,Gouvernement du Québec

Auteur(s) : Creig Lamb, Matthew Lo

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : June 2017


What rapidly advancing technology means for Canadian regional economies, especially those identified as most susceptible to automation, such as Woodstock, Ont., and Quesnel, B.C.

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : April 2017


Conducted in 2017, this follow-up research project conducted for IRCC was designed to gain a deeper understanding of the digital capacity and needs of service provider organizations that serve newcomers in Canada and inform support recommendations for the sector. OpenNorth collected the input of 261 newcomer settlement organizations with a primary data collection tool and presented its findings in a French and English webinar.

Auteur(s) : Shannon Mattern

Éditeur : Places Journal

Date de mise à jour : February 2017

Auteur(s) : N/A

Éditeur : N/A

Date de mise à jour : N/A


A collective resource for digital stewardship, digital justice and community infrastructure. These resources emphasize self-governance, participatory learning, collaborative design and sustainability. As we learn and new people contribute, these resources will grow and change over time and we welcome contributions.

Auteur(s) : Nicole Swerhun & Vanessa Av Ruskin

Éditeur : Swerhun

Date de mise à jour : N/A


Learn more about how to design, deliver, and document credible, productive consultation processes with these principles, techniques, and tools.

Auteur(s) : Multiple

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : N/A


The We Are Cities campaign, an initiative between Evergreen and McConnell Foundation’s Cities for People, engaged thousands of residents, asking them to imagine an agenda for the future of our cities. In the end, this Action Agenda was created to establish the five priority areas for action.

Matériel et logiciels

Auteur(s) : Nisa Malli, Melinda Jacobs, Sarah Villeneuve

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : March 2018


An overview of key AI concepts, their cross-cutting policy implications, and potential applications to government services and operations

Auteur(s) : James McKinney (OpenNorth), Stéphane Guidoin (OpenNorth), Paulina Marczak (OpenNorth)

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : Winter 2015


OpenNorth co-leads the standards stream of the OGP Open Data Working Group from 2014-2015. In that capacity, Open Data 4 Development funded OpenNorth to investigate reporting and analysis practices of OGP members’ catalogs, study existing processes to identify gaps and opportunities in how standards are applied and suggest baseline standards and best practices to enhance data usability.

Gouvernance

Auteur(s) : Element AI and Nesta

Éditeur : Element AI and Nesta

Date de mise à jour : March 2019


This white paper builds on a workshop that Element AI co-hosted with Nesta. The two day meeting brought together international experts on data governance, machine learning, privacy and property law, worker’s rights, and public policy to examine whether “data trusts” — a third-party stewardship model based on the common law trust — could be used to reinforce data governance and promote public trust.

Auteur(s) : Nikki Gladstone, Jo Flatt, Julie Fader, Megan Hellstern

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : Feb 2019


It is increasingly clear that data and technology are becoming synonymous with city-building. This movement towards “smart cities” will continue to accelerate in the years to come, presenting a critical opportunity and challenge for leaders in communities of all sizes. This paper, written in partnership with Code for Canada, discusses the opportunities for data and technology in Canada’s mid-sized cities, with a particular focus on Ontario.

Auteur(s) : Annalise Huynh, Heather Russek, Michelle Park

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : February 2019


As governments look to purchase innovations as well as purchase innovatively, what are the challenges and opportunities? Brookfield Institute explored innovation procurement and the potential for more experimentation.

Auteur(s) : Angela Orasch

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : May 2018


In Digital Strategies and Smart Technologies in Ontario’s Mid-Sized Cities: An Emerging Role for Administrators Angela Orasch conducts a preliminary assessment of the current governance models of smart city initiatives in Ontario’s mid-sized cities.

Auteur(s) : Amanda Smith and Geneva Starr

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : May 2018


In Smart Planning Our Future Cities: Supporting Healthy, Equitable and Sustainable Communities in the Digital Age Amanda Smith and Geneva Starr argue that developing a Smart City Master Plan can help municipalities identify needs, unite stakeholders and create a roadmap for using technology to achieve community goals.

Auteur(s) : Helen Hambly

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : May 2018


In The Role of Southwestern Ontario Mid-Sized Cities in a Regional and Rural Broadband Partnership Helen Hambly, Jamie Lee, Geoff Hogan, Tammy McQueen, and Matt Rapke consider the role of mid-sized cities in the evolving architecture of regional broadband infrastructure in Southwestern Ontario and argue that mid-sized cities play an important role in the building and expansion of scalable high-speed internet.

Auteur(s) : Professor David Wolfe

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour : April 2018


Creating Digital Opportunity is a national research partnership to identify strengths in current and emerging digital sectors, by examining the place of Canadian corporations, products and services in the global economy.

Auteur(s) : Andrew Eland & Richard Pope

Éditeur : Medium

Date de mise à jour : March 2018


Earlier this year, the London Chief Digital Officer and the Smart London board started a listening exercise to help develop the Smart London plan. The following is a response to their question of how to define a new deal for city data.

Auteur(s) : Kurtis McBride

Éditeur : CIGI

Date de mise à jour : March 2018


Auteur(s) : Evgeny Morozov and Francesca Bria

Éditeur : Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung

Date de mise à jour : Jan 2018


Following the celebration of the “creative city” (as described by Richard Florida), the “smart city” has become the new flavor of the month—and a brand. It makes clever use of resources, and it attracts money, corporate power, and private industries. As Evgeny Morozov and Francesca Bria point out, however, the problem is not merely the regulatory impulse of smart technologies. Coming from a political-economic rather than a purely technical perspective, the authors argue that the smart city can only be understood within the context of neoliberalism.

Auteur(s) : Krassimira Paskaleva, James Evans, Christopher Martin,Trond Linjordet, Dujuan Yang, and Andrew Karvonen

Éditeur : MDPI

Date de mise à jour : November 2017


The wisdom of ‘smart’ development increasingly shapes urban sustainability in Europe and beyond. Yet, the ‘smart city’ paradigm has been critiqued for favouring technological solutions and business interests over social inclusion and urban innovation. Despite the rhetoric of ‘citizen-centred approaches’ and ‘user-generated data’, the level of stakeholder engagement and public empowerment is still in question. It is unclear how smart city initiatives are developing common visions according to the principles of sustainable urban development. This paper examines how data governance in particular is framed in the new smart city agenda that is focused on sustainability. The challenges and opportunities of data governance in sustainability-driven smart city initiatives are articulated within a conceptual Framework on Sustainable Smart City Data Governance. Drawing on three cases from European countries and a stakeholder survey, the paper shows how governance of data can underpin urban smart and sustainable development solutions. The paper presents insights and lessons from this multi-case study, and discusses risks, challenges, and future research.

Auteur(s) : Teresa Scassa

Éditeur : The Star

Date de mise à jour : November 2017


Auteur(s) : Privacy International

Éditeur : Privacy International

Date de mise à jour : October 2017


The smart city market is booming. National and local governments all over the world expect their cities to become more efficient, more sustainable, cleaner and safer by integrating technology, increasing data generation and centralising data to provide better services. From large multinationals to small start-ups, companies want their slice of the multi-billion dollars per year pie of municipal budgets and long-term government contracts. But do smart cities even exist? And are our cities actually getting smarter? Or are smart cities a mere pretext to collect and process more data? This piece examines the reality of the smart city market beyond the ‘smart’ marketing term and existing smart city initiatives. We also consider the consequences and significant concerns emerging in terms of privacy and other fundamental human rights.

Auteur(s) : Ray Tomalty

Éditeur : Evergreen

Date de mise à jour : October 2017


Historically, cities have always been natural incubators for experimentation, change and progress. Today, our cities are on the brink of a new wave of innovation, driven by emerging practices related to governance and participation, a panoply of powerful new technologies, the availability of massive amounts of urban data, and novel sources and forms of capital investment. But the forces of inertia are also present in the form of established procedures, legacy mind-sets, and vested interests. To make progress, it is important that forward-looking people share a vision and language of change, take inspiration from successful models of change, and have a sense of where change can be achieved with the least resistance.This brief report takes a modest step towards addressing these needs by sketching out a theory of change that could be used by Future Cities Canada to guide the partners as they design and develop this promising new coalition.

Auteur(s) : OpenNorth

Éditeur : OpenNorth

Date de mise à jour : 2017


The Province of Saskatchewan’s Hub model is a strong example of a cross-jurisdictional, cross-sectoral, integrated service delivery model that is changing the way human services are delivered to the public. Through its highly flexible–but privacy-conscious–structure, Hubs in Saskatchewan are bringing together service providers into collaborative settings and building relationships. In this model, service providers collaborate, share data, and address common problems. Our investigation of the Hub is aimed at documenting its functioning and investigating perceptions surrounding it and the potential role of philanthropy. We would like to thank the following for their valuable input: Social Innovation Exchange (SIX), Community Safety Knowledge Alliance (CSKA), the Government of Saskatchewan (Ministry of Justice, Community Safety & Wellbeing), the Yorkton Hub and the Prince Albert Centre of Responsibility.

Auteur(s) : First Nations Information Governance Centre

Éditeur : First Nations Information Governance Centre

Date de mise à jour : May 2014


OCAP™ is the de facto standard for conducting research on First Nations, and has grown beyond research to include the governance of all First Nations information.

Auteur(s) : Kate McBride

Éditeur : Alberta First Nations Information Governance Centre

Date de mise à jour :


Auteur(s) : Caitlin Cassie

Éditeur : Brookfield Institute

Date de mise à jour :


A look at the Guelph Civic Accelerator pilot, a project that is breathing new life into traditional public procurement

Auteur(s) : Jo Bates

Éditeur : ci journal

Date de mise à jour :


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